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Nordic

This is a translation of the criteria document in Swedish.
In any case of dispute, the original document should be taken as authoritative.
Joint Nordic ecolabelling
In November 1989, the Nordic Council of Ministers adopted a measure to implement avoluntary, positive ecolabelling scheme in the Nordic countries. The scheme is administeredby national boards, which co-operate through the Nordic Ecolabelling Board. The boardamong other things chooses product groups and lay down the final criteria. Secretariats inthe participating countries are responsible for implementing the scheme on national level.
The objective of ecolabelling is to provide information to consumers to enable them toselect products that are the least harmful to the environment. Ecolabelling is intended tostimulate environmental concern in product development.
In its work on ecolabelling Nordic Ecolabelling follows the ISO 14024 standard:"Environmental labels and declarations - Guiding principles". The product groups andenvironmental and performance requirements selected by Nordic Ecolabelling reflect theobjectives, principles, practices and requirements of the standard. ISO 14024 includes therequirements that criteria should be objective, reasonable and verifiable, that interestedparties should be given the opportunity to participate and that account should be taken oftheir comments.
The criteria are based on evaluation of the environmental impacts during the actualproducts’ life cycle. Based on a thorough examination the criteria set requirements towardsa number of factors considered environmentally harmful. Upon application all productsfound to meet the requirements of the criteria are awarded the environmental label.
Due to new knowledge and production methods the criteria must be updated regularly.
The period of validity of each set of criteria is 2-3 years. New revised criteria are presentedat least 6 months prior to the expiry date. A handling fee is paid upon submission of acomplete application. The turnover value of the actual product determines the additionalannual fee.
Denmark:
Ecolabelling Denmark
15 Gladsaxe Møllevej
DK-2860 SØBORG
! +45 39 69 35 36
fax +45 39 69 21 22
Iceland:
Finland:
Ecolabelling of Hotels
072/1.2 6 October 2000
Contents
The environmental impact of hotel operations and other

Appendix 1: Supplier certificate for chemical-technical productsAppendix 2: Definition of ecolabelledAppendix 3: Statement verifying compliance with the requirements regarding the training of marketing personnel The goal of ecolabelling is to favour those product and services that have the lowest impact on theenvironment. This document encompasses hotels and associated additional services in the form ofrestaurants, conference facilities and pools.
Hotels and their additional services place demands on the saving of energy and water, as well as onminimising the use of chemicals in washing, cleaning and other areas.
Waste treatment is governed indirectly by a reduction in the total volumes purchased, and by sortingat source.
The purchase of raw materials and consumption articles is characterised both by minimal use ofdisposable products, and a general tendency towards environmentally friendly and ecolabelledalternatives.
Fixtures, fittings and inventory with a long life cycle are environmentally adapted, by paying attentionto environmental demands from the point of initial purchase. Environmental demands for transportare met by placing demands on subcontractors, the business’s own vehicles, and through certainsolutions related to the guests’ transport requirements.
The demands are expressed in the form of four limit values, which have three different levelsdepending on the scope and scale of the operation.
For energy consumption, the limit is between 230 – 430 kWh/m2, depending on climatic conditions,location, etc.
For water consumption, the limit is 200 – 300 litres per guest night.
For active chemical-technical content, the limit is between 25 – 35 grams per guest night.
For volume of unsorted waste, the limit is 0.5 – 1.5 kg per guest night.
In addition to this, the operation must fulfil a number of obligatory demands, such as: No cleaning with reactive chlorine compounds.
Sorting at source into at least four material groups.
PVC may not be purchased for fixtures, fittings and inventory.
No brominated flameproofing agents are allowed in new bought textiles etc.
This document may be copied only in its entirety and without any type of change.
Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.
Furthermore, the operation must achieve at least 65% of the total possible environmental points, andat least 45% of the points within each of the four main areas (energy, water, etc.). Measures subjectto grading include heat recovery, low-energy light bulbs, electricity generated without the use ofnuclear energy or fossil fuel, economy-flush toilets and showers, chemical-free cleaning methods,dispensers for soap and shampoo, the possibility to sort waste at source in guest rooms, ecolabelledconsumption articles, ecologically cultivated food in buffets, ecolabelled textiles, renewable fuel forin-house vehicle fleets and co-ordinated transport.
Finally, the operation must have an active, documented internal environmental work in progress,which includes a number of defined goals clearly outlined within the document. These may includee.g. procedures for ensuring the maintenance of equipment, control of energy and water loss, andpersonnel training, as well as communication to guests.
Definition of product group
This document refers to hotel operations and other short-term accommodation businesses in theNordic countries, whose prices include clean bed linen, towels, shower/bath and cleaning as aminimum. The hotel should offer breakfast. Breakfast includes washed china plates, glasses, cupsand cutlery.
Where applicable, associated operations such as restaurants, conference facilities and pool areasshould also fulfil the environmental criteria.
Market overview
No. of overnight rooms let per night in the Nordic countries (million):
Country/Year
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Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.
Product description
The product referred to in this document is not actually a physical product, but rather a service,and more specifically an accommodation service. Strictly speaking, it is not the hotel itself or theconference facilities that are subject to ecolabelling, but rather the product produced by thesefacilities.
This document is entitled Hotels as it refers to and is specifically designed for this type ofaccommodation business, as opposed to other types of accommodation service, such ascamping, holiday cabins, youth hostels, etc.
In its simplest form, the Accommodation Service/Hotel involves renting out a room for one or twonights. There are clean sheets and towels, as well as a toilet with soap and toilet paper. There isusually also a TV, and occasionally a minibar. Guests eat breakfast on site before leaving thepremises in the morning. Sheets and towels are often sent to a laundry company for washing,and are sometimes rented from the laundry.
The nature of the industry often involves a high staff turnover among e.g. domestic and washing-up personnel. This in turn places higher demands on clarity and communication if environmentalprocedures are to work smoothly and properly.
In most cases, the hotel company does not own the building itself, but rather rents the premises.
There are both chains and independent hotels.
Competition between hotels and other types of accommodation is limited to category andlocation. In simple terms, a youth hostel can hardly compete with, say, the Sheraton, and a hotelin Oslo will hardly be considered a competitive alternative to one in Finnish Lapland. For thisreason specifically, it is therefore neither relevant nor desirable to impose demands, which aretoo similar.
Other services apart from overnight accommodation are usually also offered, and e.g. restaurantbusiness can often account for a significant proportion of turnover.
Hotels belong to a large, heterogeneous group that have varying environmental impact profilesdepending on their business concept: • Winter Season hotels – have a very high energy consumption per guest night.
• Summer Season hotels – have a very low energy consumption per unit area.
• Hotels with nightclubs – high water consumption not governed by hotel guests.
• Sports/Spa – high water consumption due to extensive use of showers.
• Detached buildings leak more energy than hotels in city environments, where buildings are • The standard of buildings, i.e. year of construction etc., can involve higher energy This is one of the reasons why the demands described in this document involve both absoluterequirements in the form of limit values, and individual requirements in the form of environmentalmanagement. Graded measures can be said to be a combination of absolute and individualdemands.
This document may be copied only in its entirety and without any type of change.
Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.
The environmental impact of hotel operations and other accommodation
services

A hotel or other accommodation service generally has the same type of environmental impact as anordinary household. Bearing in mind the significant scale of a household’s impact on theenvironment, it is easy understand the reason for ecolabelling accommodation services.
The main difference is the greater extent of environmental impact in the hospitality industry, wherebyeach guest e.g. has sheets and towels washed every or every other day, compared to once a weekor fortnight in a normal household. The rooms are cleaned far more intensively, the inventory issubject to harsher wear, and resources are used less efficiently, as hotels never have 100%occupancy, whereas households normally do.
In hotels and households alike, environmental wear is strongly linked to lifestyle and activities, suchas living, eating, cleaning, washing, travelling and communicating, as well as waste managementand leisure activities.
It has previously been observed that lifestyle issues bear great relevance to the degradation ofthe earth’s resources on a global basis.
Permanent residence allows the occupant far greater control over environmental issues than thehotel scenario. The tendency is rather for the hotel to offer its guests the lifestyle (i.e. the level ofservice) it believes the guest is attracted by, which may be higher or even much higher than theguest would otherwise require.
The most important environmental aspects for hotels are taken as energy consumption, waterconsumption, use of chemicals, waste management, raw materials and consumption articles,fixtures and fittings, and transport.
When it comes to the life cycle of a building, this document refers only to the operational phase, andnot to construction and demolition. This is for purely practical reasons, i.e. hotels and conferencefacilities as a rule have no or very little influence on the construction and demolition of the building,whereas most assessments indicate that operations constitute the greatest environmental impact,primarily with regard to energy consumption.
However, this does not mean that construction or demands on selective demolition are withoutrelevance from an environmental perspective, rather the contrary. Construction, for instance, is astrategically important parameter, as the main fundamental conditions for being able to controlenvironmental impact further down the line are determined at that very point. Such demands areopen to development at a later stage as the document is revised and updated, or when a separatecriteria document for buildings is formulated.
The demands in this document have been designated point ratings on the basis of each aspect’senvironmental relevance, i.e. how closely linked they are to the prioritised environmental threats ofgreenhouse effect, destruction of the ozone layer, environmental toxins, etc, in combination with theaspects’ potential for achieving the goal of sustainable development, which can be described as thepoint at which infringement of the system conditions has ceased, (in accordance with a scientifictemplate developed by The Natural Step Foundation). The point-ratings in this document are The four system requirements for sustainable development: (1) Substances from the earth’s crust or (2)produced by society must not systematically increase in nature. (3) The physical basis for productivity and This document may be copied only in its entirety and without any type of change.
Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.
therefore largely governed on the basis of the hotel industry’s environmental profile andopportunities.
Typical reasoning processes as per the above: The issue of energy should be considered a majorconcern with regard to the greenhouse effect and the large energy consumption of buildings andhotels, while at the same time the potential for savings as a result of possible measures beingimplemented at the hotels is extremely high.
In Sweden and Norway, where e.g. electricity prices are relatively low, electricity is sometimesused in heating, which from a distribution point of view is an extremely inefficient way of usingrefined energy.
The other area of major potential savings is water, although the need to economise is not asgreat throughout the Nordic region. Denmark has the greatest need to save fresh water.
All in all, water has a slightly lower environmental relevance than energy, as fresh water is amajor global problem, but not as crucial from a Nordic perspective in terms of averages.
So the environmental aspects relating to water and energy hold just as much potential forsavings, but differ in terms of environmental relevance. They are therefore given differentemphasis in this document.
Criteria for ecolabelling
5.1 Introduction
A hotel can be granted an ecolabelling licence if it fulfils its native country’s laws and environmentallegislation, as well as the demands in this section and in section 6.
The demands for an ecolabelling licence encompass: • Documented procedures and an awareness among personnel will guarantee active environmental efforts, and ensure that the requirements described in this document can be fulfilled. Theseaspects can then easily be implemented into an environmental management system at a laterdate, see also 5.3.
diversity of nature must not be systematically deteriorated. (4) Human society must make just and efficient useof resources in meeting human needs.
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• Water.
• Laundry, cleaning, chemicals.
• Waste management.
• Raw materials and consumption articles.
• Fixtures, fittings and inventory.
• Transport.
If any of the above aspects involve subcontractors (e.g. laundry, cleaning, restaurant services), thecontracting company must also fulfil the ecolabelling demands described in this document, and bedocumented.
The demands also encompass additional services in the form of: • Meals over and above breakfast = restaurant.
• Conference facilities.
• Pool.
The information required by the ecolabelling organisation for hotel assessment is outlined in section8.
Assessment
Demands are placed according to three different forms of assessment: • Documented environmental management.
• Limit values.
• Measures implemented.
These forms of assessment vary in efficiency and relevance as regards the environmentalaspects. In many cases they complement one another, and in other cases they are generallydifficult to handle and not implemented at all. Table 5.2.1 below shows which forms ofassessment are used for each environmental aspect.
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Documented
Limit values
Measures
environmental
implemented
management
Environmental aspects:
Table 5.2.1: An overview of which assessment forms are used with regards to the variousenvironmental aspects and environmental management.
The environmental management demands are obligatory, and must be fulfilled in order to begranted an ecolabelling licence.
The demands on environmental management must be documented at the offices of theestablishment in question, as the company’s internal procedures for following up and developingenvironmental efforts must be easily available for inspection. Environmental managementdemands are outlined in section 5.3 ‘Overall environmental management’, as well as under eachindividual environmental aspect, section 5.4-5.10.
For an ecolabelling licence to be granted, no more than two of the limit values may be exceeded.
The document contains 4 different limit values pertaining to the various environmental aspects:energy, water, chemical-technical products and waste management. The demands vary instringency depending on the nature of the operation. For instance, an accommodation servicethat also incorporates a high turnover restaurant is permitted higher energy consumption. Thepurpose of the limit values is to rationalise the use of resources, and they should be reported ona twelve-month basis. The operation in question submits measured values for the latest calendaryear (1 Jan – 31 December). The four limit values can be found under the relevant environmentalaspect, section 5.4 – 5.7.
For definitions of the limit value parameters, see section 7.
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Measures implemented should comprise lists containing points from each environmental aspect.
Measures implemented should be given under two main headings: Obligatory and Graded.
Demands, which must be fulfilled, for an ecolabelling licence to be granted are: • The sum of all points for the environmental aspects must be at least 65% of the total possible • The sum of points for each environmental aspect, excluding 5.9 ‘Fixtures, fittings and inventory’ must be at least 45% of the total possible points.
• All obligatory demands must be fulfilled.
Graded measures implemented are awarded points from 1 to 3 for each measure.
The total possible number of points for different operations may vary depending on the nature ofthe business, access to services and geographical location. The differences in maximum pointspossible are made up of ‘conditional’ points. Companies to which these measures/aspects arerelevant add these points to their maximum possible points.
The lists of measures are divided into one list for accommodation, and additional lists forrestaurants, conference facilities and pool. Companies whose operation includes services aboveand beyond accommodation add the maximum possible points for any additional service(s) itmay offer to the total possible points for accommodation, and the operation is then judged as awhole. To be granted an ecolabelling licence, at least 65% of the total possible points must beachieved, and 45% of the total possible points for each environmental aspect, excluding‘Fixtures, fittings and inventory’, which carries no minimum requirement.
The parameters in Table 5.2.2 below show the maximum total points possible by environmentalaspect and additional service. Points in brackets, e.g. (+3) are conditional. These are added tothe maximum possible points if the applicant has the possibility of achieving this demand. Forexample, the demand for renewable electrical power depends on whether or not the country inquestion has an open electricity market.
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Additional services
Environmental
aspects:
Table 5.2.2 Distribution of points and total possible points for hotels and additional services byenvironmental aspect.
Example: An operation that, apart from accommodation (hotel), also offers restaurant andconference facilities has a total possible maximum of 139 points (110 + 24 + 5). In order to fulfilecolabelling demands, the operation must achieve at least 90 p (i.e. 65% of 139). This appliesprovided the operation is not subject to any conditional points (those marked with a footnote).
The operation must also fulfil 45% of the total possible points for each environmental aspect,except furnishing and possessions (chapter 5.9).
For a definition of ‘ecolabelled’, which occurs in several points in Measures implemented, seesection 7.2.
Overall environmental management
Holders of an ecolabelling licence must safeguard their environmental work within theorganisation, partly through documented, more general procedures, and partly through detailedinstructions.
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The demands on overall environmental management are obligatory. In addition to overallenvironmental management as described below, the document also contains obligatorydemands on environmental management for each environmental aspect (section 5.4 – 5.10). Foroperations certified to ISO 14001 or EMAS, it is sufficient to produce a certificate from theaccredited auditor to the effect that the demands described below have been implemented in theenvironmental management system.
Environmental policy. The environmental policy should be signed by the corporatemanagement, and specify the company’s level of ambition and endeavours in itsenvironmental efforts.
A plan of action for environmental work, updated annually with defined goals. The goalsmust be time-specific and quantifiable.
An outline of the organisation, including persons responsible for environmental work andtheir areas of responsibility / authority. This also includes the demands described in section6 regarding marketing, environmental assurance and quality assurance.
Procedures for monitoring environmental legislation relevant to the company in accordancewith the demands described in section 6.1.
Certification of the fact that all company employees and subcontractors involved in the day-to-day running of the operation, receive annual environmental training relevant to thedemands described in this document. Relevant training must involve at least 4 hours peryear per member of staff employed during that year. Procedures should be in place toensure that new employees receive a minimum of 2 hours information regarding thecompany’s environmental work within 80 working hours of being employed.
Procedures for communicating the company’s environmental policy and environmental workto employees and guests.
Procedures for environmental inspection of purchases and suppliers, complete withinstructions to employees regarding ongoing purchases. The instructions must be clearlyformulated and easily understandable.
Procedures for ensuring that the goals and plan of action are controlled. Deviations shouldbe documented, remedied and followed up. Remedial measures and follow-up should alsobe documented.
All authoritative documents pertaining to environmental management should be stored inone and the same place. Other documents must be traceable from the authoritativedocument.
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5.4 Energy
Limit values
(At least two of the limit values for energy, water, chemical-technical and waste must The limit value encompasses total energy consumption, i.e. both heating and powerfor machinery and lighting. The limit values given below apply to facilities withStockholm as their nearest point of reference. See section 7.1 for informationregarding other facilities, and a conversion table for the applicable energy value forvarious kinds of energy. Special consideration may be given for major climatedeviations from normal years, see also 7.1.
Restaurant operation turnover exceeds MEUR 2.3 or, • Leisure department has a pool of over 45 m3 Restaurant operation turnover is between MEUR 0.6 and 2.3 or, • Leisure department has a pool of less than or equal to 44 m3 Restaurant operation turnover is below MEUR 0.6 or, Environmental management
Energy consumption is controlled and measured, divided into electricity and other fuels, and is reported at least twice a year to all personnel. Readings aretaken 12 times per year. Details should be documented.
Kitchen, washing-up and domestic personnel, as well as maintenancepersonnel, are trained once a year. Part of the training contains information onhow and why energy should be saved. Training should be documented. (Thistraining can be part of the training outlined in section 5.3, point 5.) A plan of action for energy rationalisation is drawn up, specifying tangiblegoals. (This plan of action can be part of the overall action plan, see alsosection 5.3, point 2.) Documented procedures for operation and annual maintenance of high-consumption equipment, e.g. dishwashers, cookers, refrigeration equipment,ventilation units, etc. must be in place. Clear, easy to understand instructionsare drawn up for the personnel using each piece of equipment.
A control and monitoring system is available for ventilation, heat and cooling,either in the form of a computerised system, or through documentedprocedures.
Sealing of refrigerators, freezers and windows is reviewed annually anddocumented.
There is a documented procedure or a system for reducing the temperature inguest rooms and other areas not being rented or used.
There is a documented procedure for operations in the kitchen, with the aimof saving energy. The procedures are complemented by clear instructions tothe personnel.
Information is available for the guests on how they can help save energy.
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Measures implemented
The building’s total energy consumption is more than 40% below the limitvalue: 2 p, more than 25% below: 1 p.
The light bulbs used within the operation are energy saving. 90%, 2 p. 50%, 1p (% of all light sources).
Motion sensors / time control / timers are installed for lighting (inc. in guestrooms). 90%, 2 p. 50%, 1 p. Measured as % of area.
All exterior lighting is requirement controlled (time / place / strength) 1 p.
Motion sensors / time control / timers are installed for ventilation. 90%, 2 p.
50%, 1 p measured as % of area (inc. guest rooms).
Rotation control and/or timer on ventilation fans / units, 2p.
Double or triple glazing in 90% of total window area, 1 p.
Heat recovery system for ventilation and/or cooler units and/or outlet, 2 p.
All TV sets are set in rest mode, max 5 watts, 1 p.
90% of the minibars use max 1.2 kWh/24 hours, or 90% of the guest rooms All sauna units are fitted with a timer system, or there are no sauna units, 1 p.
Energy sources (the following figures refer to yearly average) At least 80% of the heating is based on energy sources other than nuclear energy, or fossil fuel from own production or via district heating, 2 p, non-specified district heating, 1 p.
Locally produced advanced technology, such as solar panels, solar cells, windmills and wave energy, is used as part of the total amount of energy used for heating. 40%, 3 p. 25%, 2 p. 10%, 1 p.
The property uses electrical power based on energy sources other thannuclear energy or fossil fuels. At least 80%, 2 p. 10-80%, 0 p. Less than 10%, Separate energy metering for the kitchen, 2 p.
Induction plates or gas on all cookers, 2 p.
Heat recycling on drainage water from the dishwashers, 1 p.
Conditional points, to be counted only if the establishment operates in an open electricity market.
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Separate energy metering for the pool area, 2 p.
Heat recycling from the dehumidification unit and/or ventilation and/or outlet, Outdoor pool is not heated, or there is no outdoor pool, 1 p.
5.5 Water
Limit values
(At least two of the limit values for energy, water, chemical-technical and waste • Restaurant operation turnover exceeds MEUR 2.3 or, Leisure department has a pool of over 45 m3 • Restaurant operation turnover is between MEUR 0.6 and 2.3 or, Leisure department has a pool of less than or equal to 45 m3 • Restaurant operation turnover is less than MEUR 0.6 or, Environmental management
M19 Water consumption is controlled and measured 12 times per year, and
reported at least twice a year to all personnel. Details should bedocumented.
M20 Kitchen, washing-up and domestic personnel, as well as maintenance
personnel, are trained once a year. Part of the training contains informationon how and why water should be saved. Training should be documented.
(This training can be part of the training outlined in section 5.3, point 5.) M21 A plan of action for water-saving measures is drawn up, specifying tangible
goals. (This plan of action can be part of the overall action plan, see alsosection 5.3, point 2.) M22 Documented procedures for operation and maintenance of water-
consuming equipment and tap-water systems must be in place.
M23 Clear, easy to understand instructions are drawn up for rectifying e.g.
dripping taps and leaking toilets. Leakage should be rectified within twodays.
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Measures implemented
Toilets use no more than 6 litres of water per flush. 90%, 2 p. 50%, 1 p (measured as % of total no. of toilets).
Toilets have 2 flush levels. 90%, 2 p. 50%, 1 p (measured as % of total no.
All mixing valves are economy flow, and have a flow of less than 10 litresper minute, 2 p. Less than 12 litres per minute, 1 p.
All mixing valves in the showers are economy flow, and have a flow of less than 10 litres per minute, 2 p. Less than 12 litres per minute, 1 p.
V54 Mixing valves are of the single tap type, 90%, 2 p. 50%, 1 p (measured as %
All urinals are fitted with motion sensors / time control for flushing, or areflushed manually, 1 p.
Water systems for cooling units are closed, or are air-cooled, 2 p.
A documented system is in place describing methods for daily use of dry cleaning methods (‘wondercloths’), 2 p.
Rainwater is collected and used for e.g. watering / toilets / laundry / car V10 Wastepaper basket in each guest toilet (inc. guest rooms), 1 p.
V11 Water gauge installed for separate metering of the restaurant’s water
V12 None of the dishwashers use more than 4 litres/basket, 2 p, 6 litres/basket,
1 p (according to manufacturer’s indications).
V13 All rinse hoses close automatically on releasing the handle, 2 p.
V14 Water gauge installed for separate metering of the pool’s water
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5.6 Laundry, cleaning and chemicals
Limit values
(At least two of the limit values for energy, water, chemical-technical and waste The limit values below refer only to cleaning and dishwasher chemicals.
• The total area is more than 15,000 m2 or, Restaurant operation turnover exceeds MEUR 2.3 • The total area is 5000 – 15,000 m2 or, Restaurant operation turnover is between MEUR 0.6 and 2.3 • The total area is less than 5,000 m2 or, Restaurant operation turnover is less than MEUR 0.6 Environmental management
M24 The consumption of chemical-technical products is controlled and
measured, and reported at least once a year to all personnel. Details shouldbe documented.
M25 Kitchen, washing-up and domestic personnel are trained once a year. Part
of the training contains information on how and why the use of chemical-technical products should be reduced, and how environmental impact canbe reduced (dosing, product information, product exchange, etc.). Trainingshould be documented. (This training can be part of the training outlined insection 5.3, point 5.) M26 A plan of action for reducing the use of chemical-technical products is
drawn up, specifying tangible goals. (This plan of action can be part of theoverall action plan, see also section 5.3, point 2.) M27 Documented procedures for purchasing chemical-technical products are in
place, involving environmental inspection. (This can be part of the overallenvironmental inspection procedures, see also section 5.3, point 7.) M28 Documented procedures are in place for dishwasher, laundry, cleaning and
chemicals handling. Clear, easy to understand instructions are drawn up forpersonnel, with the aim of reducing environmental impact.
M29 There is a written list of the chemical-technical products purchased, and all
such products used within the operation. There are product informationsheets for all chemical-technical products used.
M30 There is a notice in the bathroom of each guest room indicating that the
guest him/herself can influence whether the towels are washed or usedagain.
M31 A plan of action for phasing out the use of halogenated cooling agents is
drawn up, specifying tangible goals. (This plan of action can be part of theoverall action plan, see also section 5.3, point 2.) Refers only to dishwasher and cleaning chemicals, not laundry. Measured as active substance according to thedefinition in section 7.
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Measures implemented
CFCs are not used in the cooling unit or heating pumps.
Leakage of halogenated cooling agents amounts to max 5% per year.
No pesticides are used on the hotel grounds.
The maximum dose for medium-soiled laundry in medium-hard water is 17 g washing detergent per kg of laundry.
Alkyl phenol ethoxylates, or the cation tenside DADMAC, must not be present in any chemical-technical product, and reactive chlorine compoundsmay only be used for disinfection.
Chemical-technical products for dishwashing, cleaning and floor care used in the operation are ecolabelled. 75%, 2 p. 50%, 1 p (measured in terms of active substance, calculated on a yearly basis).
A system for automatic dosing of cleaning detergents is in place, 1 p.
Concentrated products are used in the system, 2 p (concentrated = products with max 60% water content).
A documented system is in place describing methods for daily use of chemical-free cleaning methods, 2 p.
Soap and shampoo dispensers are installed in 90% of rooms, 2 p, or 50%of rooms, 1 p.
There is ecolabelled soap and shampoo in 90% of rooms, 2 p, or 50% of The premises are connected to a treatment works that precipitates phosphorus, or exclusively phosphate-free dishwasher, laundry andcleaning detergents are used, 2 p.
HCFC has been phased out as a cooling agent, and is no longer present on HFC and other halogenated cooling agents have been, entirely or partly, replaced by more environmentally friendly alternatives (e.g. ammoniac,propane, district cooling). Over 90%, 3 p, over 50%, 2 p.
The operation softens the water for dishwashers and washing machines, K10 All large (i.e. non-household type) dishwashers are equipped with automatic
K11 Dosing of dishwasher detergent is reviewed and documented at least twice
Conditional points, to be counted only if the establishment is located in an area with a degree of water hardnesshigher than 12.
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Combined active chlorine content in the pool water does not exceed 0.5 K12 Chlorine has been replaced or supplemented with a better alternative from
an environmental point of view (e.g. ozone, UV light, hydrogen peroxide), K13 The pool is equipped with automatic dosing equipment for pool chemicals,
5.7 Waste management
Limit values
(At least two of the limit values for energy, water, chemical-technical and waste • Restaurant operation turnover exceeds MEUR 2.3 • Restaurant operation turnover is between MEUR 0.6 and 2.3 • Restaurant operation turnover is less than MEUR 0.6, or there is no restaurant Environmental management
Waste volumes are controlled and measured four times a year, and reported to all personnel at least twice a year.
The hotel has documented information from the waste subcontractorregarding the handling of waste.
A plan of action for reducing waste is drawn up, specifying tangible goals.
(This plan of action can be part of the overall action plan, see also section5.3, point 2.) There are clear, easy to understand instructions to personnel regardingwaste sorting at source, as well as information to guests regarding how theycan help by sorting their waste at source.
This document may be copied only in its entirety and without any type of change.
Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.
Measures implemented
Hazardous waste and special waste is dealt with in an environmentally correct way. (e.g. paint, batteries, neon tubes, solvents, oil spillage, Waste is sorted at source into the material groups stipulated by the localauthority. (However, the minimum requirement is that at least four material groups are sorted from the following: glass, paper, cardboard, corrugated cardboard, plastic, metal and organic waste.) An extra 0.5 p is given for each material group / hazardous waste typesorted at source and sent for recycling over and above those stipulated by the local authority, to a maximum of 3 p.
Guests can sort at source in their rooms into at least 3 material groups, 2 p. Organic waste is dealt with via composting / rotting / animal feed on site, Garden waste is put to compost, 2 p.
Worn inventory is always sent for recycling or re-use, 2 p.
The operation offers battery collection for guests, 1 p.
An inventory of all goods that may contain heavy metals such as mercury,cadmium and lead has been drawn up. Worn goods of this type have been taken to a recycling station (e.g. thermometers, barometers, dead batteries,switches, paint, etc.), 1 p.
Fat separators are installed and are emptied in line with prevailing Pan fat and deep-frying fat are sent for fat recycling.
Separate measurements of kitchen waste, 2 p.
Conference guests are given the opportunity to sort wastepaper at source, In conference rooms, guests are given the opportunity to sort into at leasttwo material groups at source, 1 p. Electronic equipment should be handed in to a recycling company, neon tubes to a facility with a speciallydesignated neon tube handling section, batteries to municipal collection or recycling, and other environmentallyhazardous waste should be collected by an approved transport company.
Conditional points, to be counted only if the establishment has a garden / gardens.
This document may be copied only in its entirety and without any type of change.
Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.
Raw materials and consumption articles
Environmental management
There are documented procedures for inspecting the purchase of raw materials and consumption articles with the aim of reducing environmentalimpact. There are clear, easy to understand instructions to all those involvedin ongoing purchasing. (Description of this can be part of the overalldescription of purchasing procedures, see section 5.3, point 7.) There are written contracts with 3 of the 10 largest subcontractors byvolume, regarding deliveries in recyclable packaging.
Measures implemented
Disposable items, portions and small packs may not be used for breakfast or in the dining room (with the exception of serviettes, toothpicks and There are always various ecolabelledproducts at the breakfast buffet. 5items, 2 p, 2 items, 1 p.
NiCd batteries are not used at all, either as disposable items or in Only ecolabelled dry cell and rechargeable batteries are purchased, 1 p.
Plastic film containing PVC is not used, 1 p.
Only ecolabelled soft paper (e.g. toilet paper, serviettes) is purchased, 2 p.
Only ecolabelled office paper and ecolabelled printed material with thecompany logo is purchased, 2 p.
There are no disposable / portion packages for bathroom articles / glasses (with the exception of e.g. shower caps, toothbrushes, etc. which are Only ecolabelled toner cartridges are purchased, 1 p.
All toner cartridges are sent for refilling, (written contract), or the machines Food and ingredients (inc. drinks) purchased for use within the operation are ecological and ecolabelled. 5%, 2 p. 3%, 1 p (measured per unit currency on At least one vegetarian dish is offered on the menu every day, 1 p.
All dishes on the menu clearly indicate the main ingredient’s origin (at leastcountry of origin), 2 p.
Beer, soft drinks and mineral water are served in deposit bottles or on For definition of ecolabelled, see Appendix 2.
This document may be copied only in its entirety and without any type of change.
Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.
Overhead slide film is PVC-free, and OHP and whiteboard markers are Conference pads and flipcharts are ecolabelled, 1 p.
Disposable glasses are not used in the conference facilities, 1 p.
Fixtures, fittings and inventory
Environmental management
Documented procedures are in place for inventory maintenance and recycling / re-use of worn inventory. There are clear, easy to understandinstructions to personnel.
Documented procedures are in place for inspecting purchases of inventory,fixtures and fittings, as well as mechanical and electronic equipment, inorder to reduce environmental impact. There are clear, easy to understandinstructions to all personnel involved. (Description of this can be part of theoverall description of purchasing procedures, see section 5.3, point 7.) Documented procedures are in place for purchasing fixtures, fittings andinventory containing timber, with the aim of ensuring that this does notoriginate from forests of high social or biological preservation values. Thereare procedures for in the first place purchasing fixtures, fittings andinventory which are ecolabelled, or which consist of timber obtained fromcertified forestry.
For definition of ecolabelled, see Appendix 2.
For definition of certified forestry, see section 7.3.
This document may be copied only in its entirety and without any type of change.
Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.
Measures implemented
Toilets should not use more than 6 litres of water per flush.
Textiles may not be treated with brominated or chlorinated flameproofing Textiles (furniture textiles not included) must be wash-resistant (i.e. not need Flooring, wallpaper, skirting boards, etc. should not contain PVC.
Electronic office machinery is non-existent, or is equipped with a stand-byfunction / timer. 90%, 2 p. 50%, 1 p (measured by no. of machines).
Computers, fax machines and photocopiers are non-existent or ecolabelled.
50%, 2 p. 25%, 1 p (measured by no. of machines).
All bed linen (sheets and pillow cases) used is ecolabelled. 25%, 2 p. 10%, None of the personnel’s work clothes require dry cleaning, 1 p.
No textiles are impregnated after washing (i.e. they are all wash-resistant),2 p.
Textiles in the guest rooms (apart from bed linen) are ecolabelled. 25%, 2 p. 10%, 1 p.
Work clothes supplied by the employer are ecolabelled. 25%, 2 p. 10%, 1 p.
For the past 3 years, all new acquisition of e.g. flooring, furniture and other fittings has been ecolabelled. Three product groups, 2 p. One product The tablecloths in the restaurant are ecolabelled. 25%, 2 p. 10%, 1 p.
Fabric serviettesare ecolabelled. 25%, 2 p. 10%, 1 p.
10 Conditional points, to be counted only if tablecloths are used in the restaurant.
Conditional points, to be counted only if fabric serviettes are used in the restaurant.
This document may be copied only in its entirety and without any type of change.
Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.
5.10 Transport
Environmental management
A plan of action for reducing transport is drawn up, specifying tangible goals. Obligatory(This plan of action can be part of the overall action plan, see also section Documented procedures are in place with the aim of reducing the amount oftransport. Clear, easy to understand instructions to personnel have been Measures implemented
The operation’s in-house vehicle / machine fleet runs on renewable fuel (e.g. ethanol, rape ethyl ester, biogas, electricity, or the vehicle is a hybrid model). 50%, 2 p. 25%, 1 p measured by litre of fuel. (‘In-house vehicles’also refers to leased equipment.) At least two suppliers / subcontractors normally drive with renewable fuel (e.g. ethanol, rape ethyl ester, biogas, electricity, or the vehicle is a hybrid There is collected, documented information regarding the largest (in termsof volume) subcontractors’ vehicles and fuels, 1 p.
Information is available to guests regarding public transport connections to and from the hotel, at least in reception, in prospectuses and in the guest Group transport for groups of guests is arranged to and from the hotel, 1 p.
Bicycles are available for guests to borrow / rent, 1 p.
There are couplings for engine heaters or parking spaces in heatedgarages, for both employees and guests, in at least 20% (1 p) or 50% (2 p) Health, safety and state requirements
The holder of an ecolabelling licence is responsible for ensuring that the ecolabelled service fulfilall the demands of prevailing legislation and local and national authority regulations in terms ofenvironmental consideration, environmental licences, and health and safety at work. ISO 14001or EMAS certification is proof enough that state regulations are being fulfilled.
At least 50% of the guest rooms must be non-smoking rooms.
12 Conditional points, to be counted only if the establishment has access to its own vehicle or machine fleet.
This document may be copied only in its entirety and without any type of change.
Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.
Environmental and quality assurance
The holder of an ecolabelling licence should, by way of documented procedures and instructions: ensure that ecolabelling criteria are fulfilled, and that the operation is being run insuch a way that it corresponds to the details submitted in the application; safeguard the level of quality of the ecolabelled service covered by the licence, sothat it continues to correspond to the information submitted; describe how the organisational for environmental assurance is structured, in orderto guarantee that the demands of the ecolabelling criteria and environmental licenceare fulfilled; work to ensure that internal control is co-ordinated through a contact person workingwith the ecolabelling organisation.
The requirement should be documented as stipulated in section 5.3 above.
6.3 Marketing
The licence applicant is obliged to train marketing personnel regarding the demands of theecolabelling criteria and the principles of ecolabelling.
The requirement should be documented as stipulated in appendix 3.
Subsequent control
Subsequent control as to whether the ecolabelled services continue to fulfil the demands may beconducted. The responsibility for this subsequent control lies with the ecolabelling organisation,as does the responsibility for the costs involved with this control. In the event that the ecolabelledservice does not continue to fulfil the demands, the licence holder is responsible for the costs ofthis subsequent control.
This document may be copied only in its entirety and without any type of change.
Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.
Definitions and clarifications
Definition of parameters for limit values
This limit value refers to kg of unsorted waste, i.e. all waste notsorted for recycling.
The number of room nights sold divided by the total number of roomnights available (based on 365 days) Given in grams of active substance, i.e. not counting any water added to the product. The total consumption for dishwashing andcleaning is added together (but not inc. laundry).
The total number of rooms available per day multiplied by the Refers to the establishment’s total energy consumption measured inkWh/m2, i.e. heating, electricity, etc., all added together. Reportedaccording to the following tables: Stockholm
This document may be copied only in its entirety and without any type of change.
Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.
Table 7.1.1 shows the limit values applicable to each reference location. Each establishmentshould select the geographically nearest reference location for the country in question. To ensureconsideration is taken for abnormal years in terms of average annual temperatures, or the factthat a reference location other than the nearest one is more closely related as regards climate, acertificate from a meteorological institution, indicating % deviation for the year in question from astandard year as compared to the alternative reference location, should be enclosed with theapplication.
Table 7.1.2, taken from the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency’s report no. 4438 and‘Energy-related criteria for Nordic Ecolabelling’ of 21-05-99. Used for calculating limit values forenergy.
One guest’s overnight stay, i.e. one rented bed per 24-hour period.
Sales of food and drink, and other restaurant-generated income.
If the establishment has more than one pool, the volumes are addedtogether to produce a total volume in cubic metres.
The establishment’s total consumption of water. (If the establishmenthas an in-house laundry, water consumption in the laundry may besubtracted from the total water consumption figure.) The total indoor area of the establishment.
Definition of ecolabelling
Ecolabelling refers primarily to Class 1 labelling in accordance with ISO 14024.
Ecolabels approved by the Nordic Ecolabelling Board are specified in Appendix 2.
This document may be copied only in its entirety and without any type of change.
Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.
Definition of certified forestry
Certified forestry should be certified in accordance with the following demands on standards andcertification systems. An example of such a system is the FSC, Forest Stewardship Council.
1. The standard should balance economic, ecological and social interests, and be in line with the UN’s Rio documents; Agenda 21 and Principles of Forestry, as well as respectinginternationally accepted conventions and agreements.
2. The standard should contain absolute demands, and promote and aim for sustainable 3. The standard should have broad national or international acceptance, and be developed in consultation with interested parties from an economic, ecological and social point of view.
The certification system should be independent and trustworthy, and be able to verify that thedemands contained in the standard have been fulfilled, and that the result can be communicated.
The following demands apply to the certification system: 1. The system should have broad national or international acceptance, and be trustworthy in relation to consumers and other important interest groups.
2. The system should be based on a trustworthy, independent and impartial assessment.
3. The system should be transparent and results-oriented, and should encourage effective 4. The system should be based on control of objective, verifiable criteria.
Application and required documents
Applications for an ecolabelling licence should be sent to the ecolabelling organisation. Allapplications are followed up by at least one control visit.
The ecolabelling licence can be applied for using a form in accordance with theregulations for pan-Nordic ecolabelling. In the application, the document entitled ‘Rules forNordic Ecolabelling of products’ should also be observed.
In conjunction with the application, the details listed below should be submitted.
As necessary, the ecolabelling organisation reserves the right to demand additionalinformation.
All documents submitted will be dealt with in the strictest confidence. Details regardingcompanies that have applied for but been refused an ecolabelling licence will be treatedas confidential.
So that the ecolabelling organisation can properly check the application, the following informationneeds to be submitted: This document may be copied only in its entirety and without any type of change.
Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.
1. The applicant must indicate which limit values and graded measures in section 5 he/she 2. Calculation of maximum points possible and number of points achieved for the conditional 3. As above, regarding calculation of points achieved for the individual environmental aspects.
4. The applicant indicates in written form how the fulfilment of each demand / measure can be 5. All subcontractors and service companies engaged by the hotel should be listed and sorted in accordance with the section introduction in this document. All chemical-technical suppliers,raw material suppliers and energy suppliers, etc. individually.
6. The following information is required for non-ecolabelled chemical-technical products: a 16- point information sheet and certificate (from the manufacturer), in accordance with Appendix1, indicating the absence of non-permitted chemicals.
7. The demand fulfilment should otherwise be verified though plan drawings showing area, copies of invoices, extracts from the accounts, certificates from the subcontractor, copies ofcontracts, certificates and other reliable documentation, or otherwise indicate a locationwhere the control organisation can conduct an inspection of the measure in question.
8. To verify demands based on the fact that certain articles and products are not present or purchased, certificates from relevant suppliers, specifications of the replacement productand/or extracts from accounts can be submitted.
The documentation should also be collected and clearly structured in files at the licence holder’spremises.
On request, the control body should be given access to the operation’s collected accounts, andgranted contact with the head auditor. Invoices and certificates should be traceable to the issuingparty.
The applicant should provide details of:
hotel’s owner(s) and a copy of the company registration.
hotel’s annual turnover and occupancy.
A description of the property’s size and ownership conditions, number of employeesand guest rooms, turnover on room rental and occupancy percentage.
A description of the operation’s total offer, including accommodation and all otherservices offered in conjunction with the same property and operation.
A description of how the ecolabelling will be used in the operation’s marketingactivities.
The design of the ecolabel
The ecolabel and a designated identification number (given below as 000 000) should be designedas follows: This document may be copied only in its entirety and without any type of change.
Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.
The label may be applied at will to buildings, flags and work clothes. It must be clearly evident tothe guest that the hotel has the official Nordic Swan label, either by clear notices in reception, orin guest information in the guest rooms.
The criteria document’s validity
This criteria document has been adopted by the Nordic Ecolabelling Board on 1 October 1999,and is valid until 30 September 2002 inclusive as version 1.0.
2 November 1999 did the leaders of the Nordic secretariats decide editorial changes. Version1.1.
31 August 2000 did the leaders of the Nordic secretariats decide editorial changes.
Version 1.1.
6 October 2000, Nordic Ecolabelling Board decided to prolong the criteria document with12 months to 30 September 2003, called version 1.2.
It is the responsibility of the ecolabelling organisation to clarify the validity aspects applicableafter this time at least 12 months beforehand. Should the document not require revision prior tothe above date, the validity period may be extended.
This document may be copied only in its entirety and without any type of change.
Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.
Future criteria
Below are some points, which will be subject to closer inspection as and when this document is laterrevised. This may therefore result in increased demands on hotels applying for ecolabelling.
• Possibly: separate, more stringent demands on restaurant services.
• More stringent demands on limit values.
• Demands on the non-use of halogenated cooling agents, primarily HCFC.
• Demands on new construction and demolition.
• Increased demands on renewable energy sources, for both electrical power and heating.
• Separate demands for electrical power and other forms of energy.
• Transport and logistics.
• Ecocycle-friendly drainage.
• Demands in line with the Swedish National Asthma and Allergy Association criteria for hotel This document may be copied only in its entirety and without any type of change.
Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.
Appendix 1
Supplier certificate for chemical-technical products
Ecolabelled
Ecolabel:
Product name:
None of the above products contains alkyl phenol ethoxylates or di-alkyl di-methylammonium chloride (DADMAC).
This document may be copied only in its entirety and without any type of change.
Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.
Appendix 2
Definition of ecolabelled
Ecolabelled refers primarily to Class 1 labelling in accordance with ISO 14024.
Ecolabels approved by the Nordic Co-ordination Body are: • The Swan (www.svanen.nu, www.ecolabel.dk, www.sfs.fi, www.ecolabel.no)• The EU Flower (www.europa.eu.int)• Good Environmental Choice (www.snf.se)• TCO 95 and 99 (www.tco.se)• ‘KRAV (www.krav.se), Finnfood LUOMU, Debio, ‘State controlled ecological’ (the ‘ö’ mark), IFOAM-accredited ecolabelling systems.
This document may be copied only in its entirety and without any type of change.
Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.
Appendix 3
Statement verifying compliance with the requirements
regarding the training of marketing personnel
We hereby confirm that we are familiar with the rules of the marketing of ecolabelledproducts to be found in Appendix 3 of "Rules on the Nordic Ecolabelling ofProducts". We hereby undertake that marketing will proceed in accordance with thesaid rules.
We also certify that we are familiar with the criteria document for hotels.
We hereby undertake that the personnel in our company responsible for marketingthe ecolabelled products will receive training in the contents of the above stateddocuments.
Name of person responsible for marketing In the event of personnel changes a new statement must be submitted to theecolabelling body.
This document may be copied only in its entirety and without any type of change.
Quotations may be made provide that Nordic Ecolabelling is stated as the source.

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